Previous Article
Time

Two Tone melody

Two Tone Melody is an experimental film that I initiated and produced with four talented film makers. It premiered during the inspiring Dutch Design Week in Eindhoven on oktober 15th 2014.

This project had the music as a starting point, and I approached it completely different from what I've done so far as a producer. The music is based on two disharmonic intervals going on a journey through four different sound 'textures'... I wrote the music with a small, classical ensemble in my head, so I avoided using 'studio production techniques'. There's not a note in this 15 minute piece that can't be performed by a real instrument in a live setting.

The idea came from the memories of hearing classical music growing up as a child. Both my parents are classically trained musicians and there was music being played all the time. The rich 'colors' and the organic way of melodies evolving has inspired me ever since.

During the writing process, I listened vigorously to modern classical composers like Steve Reigh, Louis Andriessen & Julia Wolfe (with 'Bang on a Can'), and to the Kroumata Percussion Ensemble.

I knew that this piece of music would be tuff to listen to for some of my close friends and colleagues. Nowadays we listen to music on our phones and computers most often and a 15 minute piece like this, would NEVER be played with the right concentration. That's when I started thinking of the idea of locking people up inside a dark room, with their phones turned off....

The dark movie theater with the big screen and powerful sound system is the perfect environment for concentration. That is why I chose to promote this project as a short film. I am privileged to be able to work with a group of talented young film makers. They interpreted each part in their own unique way, and together we’ve brought this project to a new level…

Stephan Cornelio Velema

Stephan’s work as a film maker reflects his design background. He combines textures and materials into an abstract visual story. The second ‘act’ is the most intimate part, and the way Stephan visualised it is spot on.

Kirtsten Swensen

Kirsten uses a self written software program called ‘Mazewarp’. This 3D software responds immediately to various sound frequencies and movements. The way these graphic images interact with the building of the piece is breathtaking.

Frank Nitty

Frank is a long time friend and colleague of mine. We've shared houses, were in a band together and since Frank moved to Hong Kong to work as a film maker, we've kept working together. His animations for the third, percussive part show some Asiatic craziness…

Fabian van Dongen

Fabian has an eye for beauty of everyday things that are often left unnoticed. In this final part of the film, he transforms from black and white to colour and beauty in a very subtle yet emotional fashion.

2016.08.30 Joris Tillmans

You may also enjoy

Next Article
Gucci 24 Hour Ace